1978 Acadian Village – Lafayette, LA

blacksmith.jpg1978 Acadian Village – Lafayette, LA

The Acadian village has been restored to its original condition by the residents of Lafayette, Louisiana.  The village is located on a parcel of land 32 acres in total with 10 acres being transformed from farmland to a shaded lived in community with a waterway running through it.

The land was being used as the LARC (Lafayette Association for Retarded Citizens) when the group decided to make this site both a visitor destination and a spot where those with developmental disabilities were able to work and take pride in their accomplishments.

The 7 buildings (of the 11) are authentic homes of the 19th century.  Each house was moved from other locations piece by piece and carefully restored.  The show the ingenuity of the early Acadian homebuilders with their use of wooden pegs, mud wall, hand-hewn cypress timbers and high-peaked roofs.

The oldest structure in the Village is the Bernard House which was built in circa 1800.  It had an addition to the house built in 1840. The house displays a painting of the exile of the Acadians from Nova Scotia in 1755 and another shows the arrival and settling along the bayous of Louisiana in 1764-65.  The oldest section of the house has an exhibit of Cajun music.

The Billeaud House was moved from the Billeaud Sugar Plantation in Broussard.  This house was built prior to the Civil War and is used as a spinning and weaving cottage today. The house contains an original loom from 150 years ago and another which is a replica.

The Blacksmith Shop is a replica which was built with weather-beaten, aged cypress boards.  The Blacksmith Shop was a key component to the existence of any village in the days when they created tools, horseshoes, nails, hinges and anything else needed out of iron.

The Castille House was built for Dorsene Castille in 1860 in Breaux Bridge.  During the time of the Civil War the house was pillaged by the Yankee soldiers but survived to be moved to the present site for everyone to enjoy. 

The house has cypress mantels that have a carved emblem on the front.  The outside figure looks like a Christian fish and the center emblem looks like a rosette and is called progression meaning a large and prosperous family.

The Doctor’s Museum was the first office of resident dentists in Lafayette, Dr. Hypolite Salles.  The building was constructed out of Cypress in 1890 with the Greek revival influence.  The original cypress shingles are still on the building beneath the red painted corrugated iron roof.  (the iron roof was installed following a devastating fire at the Lacoste Hardware Store which stood on Jefferson Street between 1910 and 1920.)

Inside the museum you will see period furnishing, medical and dental instruments, bottled medicines and powders used at the time.  There are also medical books and diplomas of area physicians from the late 19th and early 20th century.

Between 1821 and 1856 the Leblane House was built near Youngsville and was the birthplace of Acadian Senator Dudley J. LeBlanc.  LeBlanc was a sergeant in the US Army during WWI.  He spent a number of years as a politician in the rolls of Representative, Public Service Commissioner and State Senator.  This house displays exhibits of his life.

The rustic home called the St. John House was built of salvaged cypress timbers for another building.  It is currently being used as a schoolhouse. Among the desks is a three-seater which came to the Village from an old schoolhouse near Sunset, Louisiana. Old books, inkwells, lunch pails and the wooden stove round out the exhibit.

Again cypress was used in the construction of the Thibodeaux House.  This lumber is rot and insect resistant which is why so many of the homes were built out of it.  The house dates to the 1820′s and was originally from Breaux Bridge.

Acadian Village comes alive the first three weeks of December for Noel Acadian au Village drawing a crowd of over 32,000 people. With over half a million lights and animated displays, Noel Acadian is one of the largest lighting displays in the South. The program features nightly entertainment from area musicians, choirs, choruses, bands, dance troops and much more. Children of all ages can have their photo taken with Santa and receive it on the spot for a nominal charge.

Address: 200 Greenleaf Drive, Lafayette, LA 70506

Phone: 337-981-2364
Fax: 337-988-4554
Toll Free: 1-800-962-9133

Director of Acadian Village:
Email: amanda@acadianvillage.org

Tour Rates

Children 6 and under ~ free
Students 7-14 years ~ $5
Adults (15-61) ~ $8
62 years and above
Senior Citizen ~ $7
Group rates available upon request.

Hours of Operation
10:00am-4:00pm Daily (except Major Holidays)
Acadian Village will be closed on the holidays listed below:
New Years Day, January 1, 2008
Mardi Gras Day, February 5, 2008
Easter Sunday, March 23, 2008
Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 2008
Christmas Eve, December 24, 2008
Christmas Day, December 25, 2008
 

1978 Acadian Village – Lafayette, LA

The Acadian village has been restored to its original condition by the residents of Lafayette, Louisiana.  The village is located on a parcel of land 32 acres in total with 10 acres being transformed from farmland to a shaded lived in community with a waterway running through it.

The land was being used as the LARC (Lafayette Association for Retarded Citizens) when the group decided to make this site both a visitor destination and a spot where those with developmental disabilities were able to work and take pride in their accomplishments.

The 7 buildings (of the 11) are authentic homes of the 19th century.  Each house was moved from other locations piece by piece and carefully restored.  The show the ingenuity of the early Acadian homebuilders with their use of wooden pegs, mud wall, hand-hewn cypress timbers and high-peaked roofs.

The oldest structure in the Village is the Bernard House which was built in circa 1800.  It had an addition to the house built in 1840. The house displays a painting of the exile of the Acadians from Nova Scotia in 1755 and another shows the arrival and settling along the bayous of Louisiana in 1764-65.  The oldest section of the house has an exhibit of Cajun music.

The Billeaud House was moved from the Billeaud Sugar Plantation in Broussard.  This house was built prior to the Civil War and is used as a spinning and weaving cottage today. The house contains an original loom from 150 years ago and another which is a replica.

The Blacksmith Shop is a replica which was built with weather-beaten, aged cypress boards.  The Blacksmith Shop was a key component to the existence of any village in the days when they created tools, horseshoes, nails, hinges and anything else needed out of iron.

The Castille House was built for Dorsene Castille in 1860 in Breaux Bridge.  During the time of the Civil War the house was pillaged by the Yankee soldiers but survived to be moved to the present site for everyone to enjoy. 

The house has cypress mantels that have a carved emblem on the front.  The outside figure looks like a Christian fish and the center emblem looks like a rosette and is called progression meaning a large and prosperous family.

The Doctor’s Museum was the first office of resident dentists in Lafayette, Dr. Hypolite Salles.  The building was constructed out of Cypress in 1890 with the Greek revival influence.  The original cypress shingles are still on the building beneath the red painted corrugated iron roof.  (the iron roof was installed following a devastating fire at the Lacoste Hardware Store which stood on Jefferson Street between 1910 and 1920.)

Inside the museum you will see period furnishing, medical and dental instruments, bottled medicines and powders used at the time.  There are also medical books and diplomas of area physicians from the late 19th and early 20th century.

Between 1821 and 1856 the Leblane House was built near Youngsville and was the birthplace of Acadian Senator Dudley J. LeBlanc.  LeBlanc was a sergeant in the US Army during WWI.  He spent a number of years as a politician in the rolls of Representative, Public Service Commissioner and State Senator.  This house displays exhibits of his life.

The rustic home called the St. John House was built of salvaged cypress timbers for another building.  It is currently being used as a schoolhouse. Among the desks is a three-seater which came to the Village from an old schoolhouse near Sunset, Louisiana. Old books, inkwells, lunch pails and the wooden stove round out the exhibit.

Again cypress was used in the construction of the Thibodeaux House.  This lumber is rot and insect resistant which is why so many of the homes were built out of it.  The house dates to the 1820′s and was originally from Breaux Bridge.

Acadian Village comes alive the first three weeks of December for Noel Acadian au Village drawing a crowd of over 32,000 people. With over half a million lights and animated displays, Noel Acadian is one of the largest lighting displays in the South. The program features nightly entertainment from area musicians, choirs, choruses, bands, dance troops and much more. Children of all ages can have their photo taken with Santa and receive it on the spot for a nominal charge.

Address: 200 Greenleaf Drive, Lafayette, LA 70506

Phone: 337-981-2364
Fax: 337-988-4554
Toll Free: 1-800-962-9133

Director of Acadian Village:
Email: amanda@acadianvillage.org

Tour Rates

Children 6 and under ~ free
Students 7-14 years ~ $5
Adults (15-61) ~ $8
62 years and above
Senior Citizen ~ $7
Group rates available upon request.

Hours of Operation
10:00am-4:00pm Daily (except Major Holidays)
Acadian Village will be closed on the holidays listed below:
New Years Day, January 1, 2008
Mardi Gras Day, February 5, 2008
Easter Sunday, March 23, 2008
Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 2008
Christmas Eve, December 24, 2008
Christmas Day, December 25, 2008
 

 

 

 

 

 

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